Breads & Biscuits

Batter Breads

  • The warmth of the liquid used in the recipe is very important. If too hot, the yeast could be destroyed and the dough will not rise. Test the warmth on your wrist as you would with baby formula.
  • The dough should be allowed to rise during both proofing periods until double in size.
  • When done, the bread should be removed from the pan immediately and cooled on a wire rack.

Yeast Breads

  • Yeast is used to make the dough rise and also contributes to that wonderful aroma and taste of bread. The warmth of the liquid used in the recipe is very important. If too hot, the yeast could be destroyed and the dough would not rise. Test the warmth on your wrist as you would do with baby formula.
  • Flour will absorb moisture from the air under humid conditions and the amount of flour required during the kneading stage might vary.
  • The dough should be allowed to rise during both proofing periods, until double in bulk. This can be tested by indenting the dough with two fingers. If the indentation remains, the dough has risen sufficiently.
  • The bread is done if a hollow sound is heard when the loaf is lightly tapped. When done, remove from the pan immediately and let cool.

Biscuits

  • Accurately measure ingredients. Flour is measured by spooning into a measuring cup and leveling off with a straight edge. Sifting is not needed.
  • Vegetable shortening should be packed into a measuring cup so there are no air pockets. Then it is "cut" into the flour mixture using a pastry blender, two knives or a fork. The result should be pieces the size of coarse crumbs.
  • Mixing the liquid ingredients into the dry ones can be done effectively with a fork. First, make a well in the center of the flour. Using a fork to gently blend in the milk or buttermilk lessens the chance of over-mixing.
  • Turn dough onto a lightly floured pastry cloth or other surface. Knead gently only until dough holds together and can be rolled out - about 10 to 12 strokes or less. Do not add too much additional flour when kneading and rolling.
  • Roll dough to about 1/2-inch thickness to ensure a biscuit with good height. Cut biscuits with a sharp-edged cutter. Cut straight down without twisting cutter to ensure tall, straight biscuits.
  • Place on a baking sheet 1-inch apart for crusty sides or almost touching for soft sides.

Pizza Crusts

  • Because hard wheat flour absorbs more liquid than soft wheat flour, only 2 to 2 1/2 cups of Bread Flour (hard wheat) will be needed. If using All-Purpose Flour (soft wheat), 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 cups may be used. The moisture content of the flour and the level of humidity will also affect the amount of flour required.
  • The texture of the pizza crust may vary depending upon the type of flour used. A thinner, crisper crust will be the end result of using White Lily All-Purpose Flour. When making pizza crust with White Lily Bread Flour, the crust will be thicker and chewier.
  • To save preparation time, the pizza dough may be made ahead and stores in the refrigerator up to three days or in the freezer for one month. Or, bake the crust ahead of time and just add toppings before final baking for easy entertaining. Baked crusts can also be stored in the freezer.